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Discussion in 'The 'Kind Kitchen' started by DXE, Mar 14, 2015.

  1. DXE

    DXE Moderator

    GreetingsLike most of us - I have been playing making cookies and stuf for years. Halve always made my butter the old fashioned way and never played much with cooking oils or tinctures.Well - this has changed!!!!I just bought a Magic Butter machine - awesome little device!!!!Ran my first batch of coconut oil last night and will be whipping up some brownies today.I do have a question for the serious edible folks out there.I made the oil with 5 cups of Coconut oil and 100 grams of 20% thc bud.I know this is not scientific - that would require lab equipment - BUT is there a general rule of thumb equation where I can get a somewhat accurate number representing Mg THC in the finished product?For example:I know my Infusion (Coconut oil) plus 100G raw weed weighs 742 grams.I my recipe calls for 1/2 cup oil - 103 gramsIs there any way to APPROXOMATE how many Milligrams of THC each serving contains??

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 14, 2015
  2. DXE

    DXE Moderator

    I did find this - make any sense??


    I talked with Jessica Catalano about home cannabis cooking recommendations and THC dosage. Catalano is the Summit County-based author of “The Ganja Kitchen Revolution” and chef for Cultivating Spirits, a mountain retreat cannabis tour company.


    First, identify the percentage of THC in the strain you’re cooking with. Catalano says on average, most strains have about 10 percent THC. Strains that have 15-20 percent THC are above average, and those with 21 percent THC or higher are exceptionally strong. If you can’t find online plant breeding information or cannabinoid lab tests for the strain, estimate at 10 percent THC.


    You are starting out with a quarter ounce of marijuana, that’s 7 grams. An eighth would be 3.5 grams.


    Every 1 gram of cannabis bud has 1,000mg of dry weight. If a strain has about 10% THC, ten percent of 1,000mg would be 100mg. So for cooking or baking at home, it is safe to assume that a gram of cannabis contains at least 100mg THC.


    Using Catalano’s dosing measurement formula, you do the math accordingly to find out how much THC per serving. Take the amount of ground marijuana, convert it to milligrams and divide it by the recipe yield to determine a per-serving dose of THC. A starting dosage for beginners is 5 milligrams per serving (the Colorado-mandated serving size for marijuana-infused edibles is 10mg THC). Three grams of ground marijuana equals 300mg THC. 300mg divided by the recipe yield, (a classic cookie recipe makes 60 cookies) equals 5mg per cookie. If you want to be even more cautious with your at-home cannabutter cooking, 1.5 grams (150mg) marijuana divided into a 60-cookie recipe will yield 2.5mg a serving.
     
  3. Mrgreenjeans

    Mrgreenjeans Administrator

    I'm glad your enjoying your magic butter machine. I love mine.


    Real good info sex. :redbong:
     
  4. DXE

    DXE Moderator

    Ok - some quick math here - does this make any sense??


    Total weight of infused oil 742 grams


    Total weight of 1/2 cup of infused oil 103 grams


    742/100 = 103/x


    Solve for x will give % weight of infused oil to total weight of oil - 13.8 percent


    Now calculate 13.8 percent of the 100000 Mg of bud used in the infusion - 13,000 Mg


    Divide 13,000 (total Mg THC in 1/4 oil) by number of servings (12) and you get bout 1000Mg per brownie - California levels (colorado max is 100mg)


    NICE
     
  5. ResinRubber

    ResinRubber Civilly disobedient/Mod

    I see a lot of folks touting THC content as published by the breeders. This is hogwash. That would mean the same strain grown in a newbie garden under CFL's is going to be just as potent as grown by me. You and I all know it ain't happening. Unless you have the actual pheno/run/plants being used tested you have no idea what the THC content really is.


    You can do all the math and get close....but it's still a shot in the dark. Estimate 10% THC? What if it's actually 15% or 6%? That's a ninety percent swing in dosage and not at all uncommon. It's also the difference between a brownie that doesn't do shit and one that moves the earth. This is why I went to Iso, BHO, and organic extractions for cooking when dosages are important. It's still crude and subject to fluctuation....but....that fluctuation is on a much lower par when compared with crude weights of dry plant material.


    Moisture content in crude material also comes into play. Wet trim? Dry trim? Kind of moist trim? All have different weights but the same THC content for the same plant.


    If you want dosage accuracy you need to extract first, or, use a test lab. Period. I know this because I went through the exact same process you are now DXE.


    For general cooking, and overall enjoyment, making oil/butter direct from plant is fun, easy, and tasty if done right. But don't go getting all hung up on dosage....every run will be different. Best you can do is assume the median value possible for all variables and hope your skill as a gardener, and talent as a cook, keeps you on the high end.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 14, 2015
  6. CREATIVE GARDENER

    CREATIVE GARDENER Cured Fat Sticky Bud

    I was under the assumption that the THC % was not of bud weight but the % in the oil. Because you really have no idea what the moisture content is or the oil content by weight. So you would have to extract the oil then calculate the amount used and the THC % to determine the dosage.


    The math is fairly simple, the refinement would be the more difficult part.


    Be Cool, CG
     
  7. ResinRubber

    ResinRubber Civilly disobedient/Mod

    Exactly CG. Further reason why dry weight of crude material cannot be used to accurately assess dosage.
     
  8. CREATIVE GARDENER

    CREATIVE GARDENER Cured Fat Sticky Bud

    And I was reading somewhere that most of the time the THC level was tested when it was still THC-A. And when the THC-A decarbs, looses a CO2 molecule, into THC it will loose about 10% of it's weight. Thus dropping the level by 10%.


    I think most of the numbers can be used as a reference to compare strains A to B to C. But their accuracy isn't dependable.


    Be Cool, CG
     
  9. friendlyfarmer

    friendlyfarmer Rollin' Coal

    Yeah testing the THC levels would require testing after it was heated and totally decarbed. Otherwise it's non-psychoactive THC-A.
     

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